Popular Sylvia Plath Books

Popular Sylvia Plath Books

Sylvia Plath is an American writer who was born in the year 1932 in Boston, Massachusetts. She received an acclaim as a poet and writer from the University of Cambridge. Sylvia’s work was brilliant, and her poems are lovely to read. She was clinically depressed, and she committed suicide in the year 1963. She was said to be taking electroconvulsive therapy, but she couldn’t be treated for the depression. Sylvia won the Pulitzer Prize for her collective pomes in the year 1982. Her husband removed some of her works, but many editors came forth to compile the complete edition of her work.

The following are some of the best books of Sylvia:


Ariel is, without doubt, one of the best works of Sylvia Plath. She wrote Ariel after she was separated from her husband in the year 1962, the year before she committed suicide. It is known that she would wake up early in the morning before her child would wake up and start to write. Sylvia Plath’s husband rearranged the contents of the book after her death and even omitted some poems. But her daughter released the book Ariel in a restored version where the book is how Sylvia Plath had intended it to be.

The Bell Jar:

The Bell jar is the only novel that is written by Sylvia Plath. The Bell Jar is about delusional young men and women, and it is a must-read for every teenager who is suffering from mental illness and battling with failure and cynicism. The Bell Jar was rejected many times by both the American and the English publishers because the book was mostly autobiographical.

The Unabridged Journals:

Sylvia kept a remarkable record of her private thoughts. She is an obsessive diarist, and she always held a record of what had happened to her. In the year 1982, a book was released, but it did not contain many details as her mother, and her husband had omitted some of the works considering it to be messy. But in the year 2000, an editor named Karen V. Kukil restored those journals and included all the omitted records, and it includes the part where she was in the mental institution, he letters to her ex-boyfriend and her struggle to become a great poet.

Letters Home:

Sylvia was quite connected with her mother, and she often wrote many letters to her mother. She wrote about her mother and recorded each incident that happened from the time she was living at home and when she was away from home for the first time at Smith College and Cambridge and then later in her married life with Hughes. It is quite fascinating to read all her letters. You will be able to understand what is going on in her life as opposed to what she writes to her mother.